+27 (0) 21 762 6531

Mon - Fri 8.00 - 17.00

Top
Birds Archives - Walk in Africa
51
archive,category,category-birds,category-51,mkd-core-1.1.1,mkdf-social-login-1.2,mkdf-tours-1.3.1,voyage-ver-1.5,mkdf-smooth-page-transitions,mkdf-ajax,mkdf-grid-1300,mkdf-blog-installed,mkdf-breadcrumbs-area-enabled,mkdf-header-standard,mkdf-no-behavior,mkdf-default-mobile-header,mkdf-sticky-up-mobile-header,mkdf-dropdown-default,mkdf-light-header,mkdf-full-width-wide-menu,mkdf-fullscreen-search,mkdf-search-fade,mkdf-medium-title-text,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.2.1,vc_responsive
9 Feb

The adventures of Bill and the birders ( or patterns in nature)

It's already February  and I haven't written a newsletter for months.  I apologise,  but life has just been too exciting.Tonight as I was looking back on my adventures in order to choose a theme for a newsletter, I was flooded with wonderful recollections of times with friends and clients in Victoria Falls, Hwange, Cape Town, Uganda, Belgium, Singita, Table Mountain, Timbavati, The Succulent Karoo, Namibia, The winelands, The Cederberg . . . I hope to share all of these adventures with you  but the one that is demanding to be heard...

21 Oct

Flying pink whales

At the risk of being boring, I must mention once again that I live in an incredibly beautiful part of the world. This picture of a flock of Greater Flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber) was taken just a few minutes away from my house. These elegant birds feed on tiny insects, crustaceans and diatoms, which they obtain by filtering the water through fine bristles in their bill. This is precisely the same technique used by Baleen Whales to extract their tiny food species from the water. In fact many fish species as well...

7 Jun

Once were Crimsonbreasted Shrikes

The Central Kalahari was exquisite and we saw so much that was special but before I even begin this blog I must get something of my (not-crimson) chest . . . I am sick of these bird name changes! It was bad enough that southern Africans had to buying viagraadopt most of the East African names but the changes of common names just seem to continue. I am beginning to wonder whether the conspiracy theorists aren't correct and it is all just a ploy to increase sales of bird guide...

27 Feb

The Okavango in the wet season

I have just completed a fantastic safari in The Okavango Delta of Botswana. This magical paradise is my favourite place on earth. At present it is the rainy season up here and while this makes driving more challenging the rewards are bountiful. For a start everything is lush and green and most animals have recently given birth. Also the flowers are out in abundance. Most impressive was the Impala Lily (Gloriosa superba) which also happens to be the national flower of Zimbabwe. Although this plant is poisonous it is also of...

26 Nov

Dolphins

The Whale Trail is a remarkable Cape Hike. The first days take one through beautiful fynbos vegetation and over hills with magnificent vistas, but then it drops to the coast and one walks along the sea for days. Here the focus shifts away from flowers to marine creatures and breathtaking scenery. Although there is less fynbos to see, this collection of gooseneck barnacles were reminiscent of an abstract flower arrangement. Dolphins are reguarly seen on along this section of the Whale Trail. And we also found this nesting colony of Cape Cormorants that...

22 Nov

Of lizards and birds

On the 2nd day of the Whale Trail we met this magnificent rock agama and he illustrated the concept of selective conspicuosness. His brightest colours are below his neck. So he positions himself on a high rock and bobs his head. In this way the lizards get an excellent view of his brilliantly coloured neck, but the birds of prey above do not! Pretty smart. Later we saw a male Cape Sugarbird who deals with a similar challenge differently. He is drably coloured but has a long streaming tail. When he...

20 Oct

ROCK KESTRELS ON TABLE MOUNTAIN

Last week when I was walking on Table Mountain I came across this beautiful Rock Kestrel. He allowed me to approach so close that I suspected he could not fly. However when some other walkers approached he flew-off quite capably. These small raptors are fairly common around Table Mountain, where they feed on insects, lizards and small rodents. Apparently they will sometimes also feed on small birds and bats....